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Recht op nationaliteit in TRNC

Marieke Hopman

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11 oktober 2018

Update: sharing our research findings in Cyprus, part 3

11 oktober 2018 | By | No Comments

A very quick update, as I’m very tired and would like to stop working. However I wanted to quickly let you know how we are doing. Over the past few days me and Ambra have been running around from meeting to meeting, often splitting up so that we can do two at the same time. We’ve met with journalists, politicians, embassies, UNDP and people who participated in the research.

Meanwhile we are organizing two events: one this Saturday for international students in TRNC, to discuss with them the rights of children of international students in the TRNC; the second next Monday. The latter is a public event where we hope people from two sides (north and south) will come to discuss the rights of children living in north Cyprus with us.

Below some pictures!

Visiting the Canadian Consulate

Visiting the Canadian Consulate

Visiting the German embassy - the ambassador was so happy to receive some "Stroopwafels" (Dutch cookies)!

Visiting the German embassy – the ambassador was very happy to receive some “Stroopwafels” (Dutch cookies)!

Live on Radio Mayis to discuss our research!

Live on Radio Mayis to discuss our research!

Ambra talking about the research in a national newspaper

Ambra talking about the research in a national newspaper

Warmly welcomed by a very nice team at the Dutch embassy

Warmly welcomed by a very nice team at the Dutch embassy

 

 

 

Marieke Hopman

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8 oktober 2018

Marieke Hopman

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6 oktober 2018

Northern Cyprus: Sharing research findings II

6 oktober 2018 | By | No Comments

From 4-16 October Marieke and Ambra are in Cyprus to share the results of the research on the child’s right to nationality in the TRNC. On this blog, you can follow our adventures! If you haven’t yet, you can sign up on the right to get automatic e-mails when there is a new update –> 

Thursday night (4 Oct) we arrived in Cyprus, with a mission to share the findings of our research with as many people as possible, and in particular those who can make a difference for children living in the TRNC (politicians, journalists, international actors). So far people are so excited about the research, we are welcomed everywhere almost as heroes! At the same time it is challenging, because everything goes “Cyprus style” (which means: take it easy, no rush, but also: you can speak to anyone, even the president, if you know someone who knows him). In addition, we’re a little anxious as to how people will react, both in the north and the south, because the topic of nationality is a VERY sensitive topic.

The reports

The reports

For example, on Friday we met with the NGO “Home for Cooperation“, who want to host an event (happening 15th of October) during which we present our research and have a discussion with the audience. We hope that people from both sides (north and south of Cyprus) will attend. During the event, will not be allowed to use “TRNC” or even “the North” but instead have to speak about “the northern part of Cyprus”.

 

Picking up the 350 research reports

Picking up the 350 research reports

On Saturday we picked up the printed reports. There are 350 copies in total: 250 in Turkish, 150 in English. And they look great!! After that we met with the TRNC Minister of Education. Because we found in our research that who gets (good quality) education and who does not is very much connected to the ethnicity and nationality of the child, we wanted to talk to him to share our findings. We weren’t sure whether he would be interested, but we ended up talking for almost two hours!

With the TRNC Minister of Education (and translator Ali)

With the TRNC Minister of Education

Later in the day we drove to Famagusta to share the reports with journalist Metin Ziya Güngör. We took some photos to go with the article (to pose professionally is still a bit of a challenge…) and he will write about the research, an article which will be sent to, and may be printed by, all newspapers in northern Cyprus. So hopefully this will spread the news.

Taking a picture for the news article

Taking a picture for the news article

On Monday we will publish the report online, so stay tuned for more of our adventures and to read the report…

Marieke Hopman

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21 september 2018

Northern Cyprus: sharing the results 1

21 september 2018 | By | One Comment

Dear all,

It’s time for a new update! Exciting things are happening. I spent most of the summer writing a research proposal for the Dutch science organization NWO, for a follow-up project of 4 years to the PhD. If we get it, it will be another research on children’s rights including 4 case studies, yet this time Bigger and Better: the project includes 5 NGOs, 7 universities and 9 professors. We will get our first reviews in about two weeks, so fingers crossed!TRNC report 1

Second, over the summer me and Ambra have been working on the report on the child’s right to nationality in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. report 3Below you see a preview of some of the pages of the English version, it will also be published in Turkish.

 

You may be wondering why it looks so nice? This kind of design must be very expensive? Well, no! What happened: some time ago, I did a radio interview about my research on Dutch national radio. Rik Hurks, CEO of marketing & communications bureau Mannen van 80, heard this interview and was moved by the story. He got in touch and turned out to be very enthusiastic about the research project and wanted his company to do some social responsibility. And so for a very low wage they are designing this report so beautifully – and not just that, they are also making an online quiz! Mannen van 80 are also part of the NWO application so I hope we get to work together much more in the future.

From 4-16 October me and Ambra will be in Cyprus to share the research results. We are currently setting up a program which hopefully includes meeting with political actors (national and international), media engagement and discussion events. To be continued…!

report 2

Marieke Hopman

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13 juli 2018

First output research on child’s right to nationality in TRNC

13 juli 2018 | By | No Comments

Dear all, I am very happy and proud to share with you our first official output of our research on the child’s right to nationality in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus! This document is a UPR shadow report to the UPR of the Republic of Cyprus. Basically, every four years, every member state of the UN has to report to the UN Human Rights Council to say how they are doing on protecting human rights in their country. To get good information on the human rights situation in states, the Council also asks NGOs to write so-called “shadow reports”. Together with the NGO Institute for Statelessness and Inclusion (ISI), yesterday we submitted a report on the rights of Turkish Cypriots to a nationality, and on subsequent (violation of) human rights resulting from whether or not someone has a certain nationality. Please note that, because this submission is about human rights in Cyprus as related to the Republic of Cyprus, other issues with right to nationality for people living in North Cyprus are not part of this report. Members of the research team are: Ambra, Céline, Florentina, Nikki and Raphaela. I (Marieke) have been leading the research. UPR Cyprus ISI UM researchers

Ambra Borne

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13 juni 2018

Derde case study: het recht op nationaliteit in Turkse Republic Noord Cyprus (TRNC)

13 juni 2018 | By | No Comments

Dear All,

After much secrecy and anticipation, we are very excited to share with you a case study that we have been working on for almost a year now; the child’s right to a nationality in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC)!

Although extremely interesting, this case is far from simple and so I, Ambra, Marieke’s intern, will be walking you through the journey of this case and research project. With a team of 5 students and Marieke, this project has taken on three trips to the TRNC, a fundraising campaign, an upcoming report (and more – cannot disclose them yet!) since July 2017. Finally, we can share it with you!

Ali (one of our translators), Marieke and I

Ali (one of our translators), Marieke and I

The TRNC is an unrecognised state situated in the northern part of the Mediterranean island of Cyprus. Due to being only recognised by Turkey, the children’s right situation is unique, especially when it comes to the child’s right to nationality. How are children’s right protected? What does having TRNC nationality entail? What does the child’s right to nationality mean in the TRNC?

Before any of these questions can be answered, it is essential to glance at the history of the island of Cyprus. Although Cyprus has experienced many different authorities and sovereignties throughout centuries (Venetians, Ottoman, British), it has been home to two main populations: the Turkish Cypriots and Greek Cypriots. Soon after its independence in 1960, and the creation of the Republic of Cyprus, tensions and unrest emerged between these populations which would eventually cause the island to be politically altered to this day.

With increasing nationalism and varying political ideologies, violence erupted between Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot communities which resulted in a military intervention from Turkey in 1974. Claiming to be for the protection of the Turkish Cypriots, this involvement has been, and continues to be, highly debated among the international community. Nevertheless, the TRNC state was declared itself as an independent state in 1983.

The divided island of Cyprus

The divided island of Cyprus

For the majority of the last 40 years, the Turkish Cypriot community has been isolated from the world due to a heavy economic embargo and only being recognised by Turkey. Peace negotiations have been attempted, and failed, many times over all these years. In 2003, the border between the TRNC and the Republic of Cyprus opened for the first time. The following year, the Republic of Cyprus became a member of the EU. This is still the current situation of the TRNC. There is still an economic embargo, the territory of northern Cyprus is still claimed by the Republic of Cyprus, the TRNC is still unrecognised.

Like many other unrecognised states, the discussion revolving around the TRNC is heavily politically charged and sensitive for many. As consequence, we decided to announce this research project once all the data had been collected, which is now! We (myself, Marieke and four other students) spent a total of nine weeks in the TRNC interviewing all different kinds of people; children, parents, teachers, politicians, international students, journalists, housewives, etc. all to answer the question: what is the meaning of the child’s right to a nationality in the TRNC?

This case study has included many ups and doThe divided island of Cypruswns, challenges and opportunities, breakthroughs and setbacks. But, ultimately, it has provided an insight into children’s rights in an unrecognised state. More soon!

Crossing the border from the Republic of Cyprus to the TRNC

Crossing the border from the Republic of Cyprus to the TRNC

 

Two members of the team after a hard day at work!

Two members of the team after a hard day at work!